Foodie

Saturday, June 06, 2009

Kuih Bahulu


I would like to thank Helen Ong, Bee Ling's mom who bought this mould and Bee Ling for bringing it back to me all the way from Penang. Without their kind gesture, making this kuih and keeping up with traditional kuih, will not be possible. Thank you.
Kuih Bahulu is traditionally Malaysian, it will be served during the Hari Raya and Chinese New Year. The moulds were made from cast-iron with a lid, of which lighted charcoal will be on it. Baking is done by putting the mould over charcoal. Thank goodness for the oven, otherwise the younger generation will not be introduced to these cookies. BTW, should this kuih be a cookie or a cake?














Ingredients:

2 large eggs
3 tbsp sugar
1/3 cup all-purpose flour + 1 tbsp(for friends in Denver)
1/2 tbsp cornstarch/cornflour
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/8 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp oil(optional)
Oil for greasing the moulds


Method:
For friends at sea-level where humidity is high, dry fry the all-purpose flour in a wok over the stove or put in a parchment paper lined microwave safe bowl and microwave - time depends on the amount of flour. Cool before using.

Arrange oven racks to the lower rung of the oven. Turn on oven to 425f.
Put the moulds in the oven while it is preheating, it should be about 10 minutes.
Grease the moulds and leave in the oven while you prepare the batter.
Sieve flour, cornstarch and baking powder 3 times and leave aside.
Heat an inch of water in a small saucepan of which the mixing bowl can sit on. Mixing bowl must not touch the water.
Bring the water to the boil and then lower fire so that water is only simmering.
Put in sugar into the mixing bowl and then the eggs - these 2 should only be put together, only when the water is simmering.
Place mixing bowl over simmering water and whisk until the egg mixture is warm to the touch - about 105 - 115f.
Remove from the saucepan and beginning whisking on high until mixture has cooled and doubled and reached the ribbon stage.
Add in the vanilla extract and then the flour. Fold in gently, do not overmix.
Fill the heated moulds 3/4 full of batter and put in to bake for 10 minutes.
Remove from oven and leave to cool for awhile before removing kuihs from mould.
Cool and keep in airtight container.
This recipe should be enough to make 24 kuih bahulus so it will help if you have 2 moulds which have 12 holes.


Serves

27 comments:

Ube said...

Thank you Helen Ong and Bee Ling for the kuih molds. Your generosity is greatly appreciated and adding another dimension of flavor to this blog. Thank you too goes to Lilying for her tireless efforts in sharing her wonderful tried and true tested recipes. I am Filipino true and true and I believe we have something like this which we call them "MAMON" and I believe they are sponge cakes. They have baking molds for them. Some innovative folks put a variety of toppings on them. Some brushed them with softened butter, grated cheddar cheese and table sugar. Some use whipped cream and finish it off with berries in season.

Cindy Khor said...

ooo, this reminds me of of my childhood breakfast. its a pity i don't have the mould to make this, or else i could make them myself as uk doesn't really have these stuff

Mary said...

These are beautiful to look at. I'm guessing they are a cookie - perhaps with the texture of a madeline.

Angie's Recipes said...

They look beautiful.....flower sponge

Shirley said...

May I know how long do I need to fry dry those flour in the wok? It is one of my favorite kuih.

delia said...

Hi aunty,
this happens to be one of my favourites. will try this out once i get the moulds. BTW, do you have the recipe for kuih cangkeh? it's green on top and gula melaka bottom, steamed in small tea cups.

lilyng said...

shirley

it does not have to be too long, becauce of the humidity at sea-level, the fried flour will be rid of some moisture and make the cake lighter. you can always sun the flour too. the most important step is to beat the egg and sugar mixture until thick and ribbon stage and fold in flour gently without deflating as much foam as possible. Getting the moulds heated to ensure proper browning

adeline said...

hi

can i chk with u. how is the texture for the kuih using this recipe?

is it crispy outside & soft inside?

tks

lilyng said...

adeline

yes, just like how you describe them, crispy outside and soft inside

tazyspin said...

Hi Lily,

What do you mean by ribbon stage?

Cheers!

Jackie

lilyng said...

jackie

ribbon stage means that the egg and sugar mixture is beaten in medium speed until it reaches a stage where a design will form a slowly disappearing ribbon on the surface of the mixture when some of it is lifted with a utensil and is allowed to fall back into the bowl.

Anonymous said...

hi, just to check with you... the kueh i made doesn't have the same textures as yours... ittiz all shiny shiny and hard on the outside... unlike yours... can you tell me what is wrong?

lilyng said...

anonymous

if your kuih is hard, then the beaten eggs must have collapsed when you add in the flour.

Kim said...

Hi Aunty Lily:

I'm from Malaysia.

I'm baking this now. Questions:

1.My beaten eggs looked foamy though i managed to get to ribbon stage and doubled it. Is this correct?

2. 1st batch that I baked, the whole texture was cripsy. For the 2nd batch, I then lowered it to 210degrees celcius (from originally 425f which is 218c) & managed to get the cripsy on the outside and soft in the inside!! 3rd batch, again a little too cripsy on the inside as well. Wonder what's the correct temp to set? Final batch, still it looked much darker than yours...

2. My batter risen only very slightly. Is this suppose to be the way I wonder?

Thank you.

Cheers!
Kim

lilyng said...

kim

if you kuih has gone all crispy, then it is overcooked/overbaked - too long in the oven. a good tip for kuih bahulu is to heat up the mould and the cooking is very fast.

Anonymous said...

i like kuih bahulu,1kg i eat

liza said...

I like eat kuih bahulu,I must try your resepi

sokeleng said...

I like your kuih bahulu . It look so delicious. I just bought my
bahulu mould
, will try out your recipe this weekend. Thanks for your informative website and your hardwork.

Happy New Year

KINDergARTen said...

Hi Lily,

May I know why do we whisk the eggs on top of the simmering water?

lilyng said...

kindergarten

we first warm the eggs and sugar, over a water bath, which melts the sugar so that the eggs will reach their full volume when beaten thus making light and airy kuih bahulu

Anonymous said...

Hi, can I know how many gm of flour is 1/3 cup? And what kind of flour is the best? And during the whisking over the bolling water can I use hand to whisk beside using machine? And what do u means by after removing from the sausepan must whisk until it's reach the ribbon stage? What does ribbon stage means? Pls reply me ASAP,thanks.

lilyng said...

anonymous

1/3 cup is 30 grams according to http://www.pastryscoop.com/category/look-it-up/flour/.

I used all-pourpose/plain but if you have cake flour, superfine flour you can use these and omit the cornstarch and increase the cake flour to 35 gms.

yes, absolutely, use the hand whisk, to prevent the eggs from scrambling. Cooking over simmering water is to dissolve the sugar and warm eggs when whisked give better volume.

After the sugar has dissolved, remove from heat and use the stand mixer or electric hand mixer and whisk until the egg mixture is double in volume and pale white. It takes a while to reach this stage and when the batter is lifted up and When they're ready, they will hold a ribbon when the beaters are lifted from the bowl

lilyng said...

anonymous

1/3 cup is 30 grams according to http://www.pastryscoop.com/category/look-it-up/flour/.

I used all-pourpose/plain but if you have cake flour, superfine flour you can use these and omit the cornstarch and increase the cake flour to 35 gms.

yes, absolutely, use the hand whisk, to prevent the eggs from scrambling. Cooking over simmering water is to dissolve the sugar and warm eggs when whisked give better volume.

After the sugar has dissolved, remove from heat and use the stand mixer or electric hand mixer and whisk until the egg mixture is double in volume and pale white. It takes a while to reach this stage and when the batter is lifted up and When they're ready, they will hold a ribbon when the beaters are lifted from the bowl

Anonymous said...

Hi,thanks for ur reply. Sorry I got some more question to ask u. So u means if I'm using cake flour or super fine flour then I don't have to use corn flour anymore is it? And 1/8 tsp baking powder is how much? Because the measuring spoon that I bought only have 1/2 n 1/4 tsp. Is 1/8 tsp equal to 1/4 tsp or half of 1/4 tsp? I'm living in Singapore So do I still need to fry the flour before I use or don't need? Regarding of the oven temperature 425F is equal to how many °C? And mixing the sugar n egg I still got to turn on the fire to the smallest or after the water boil I just remove from the strove n just mix the sugar n egg on top of the boil water? Sorry that I have So much question to ask because I try alots of others recipe And all turn out very hard. So I'm So disappointed. Hope u don't mind that I have So much question to ask u. Really thanks.

Anonymous said...

Sorry I forgot to ask u, what do u means when adding in the flour must fold in gently do not overmix? And when putting in the flour can I use machine to do it or I can only use by hand to fold in the flour?

Anonymous said...

Hi,I have try ur recipe. But after bake it's crispy outside But after it cool then is not crispy anymore? Can u tell me what wrong is it? Or what I have done wrong? Thanks!

lilyng said...

anonymous

yes, cake flour is already low gluten, cornflour has no gluten so when added to all-purpose flour so that the gluten present will be reduced.

although baking is not rocket science, it has to be correct. so, if no 1/8 tsp is not available, just use the 1/4 tsp and measure half.

if you need to know about conversions , please google and you will get the answers.

you use a stainless bowl or the stand mixer bowl to oook the eggs and sugar. Put is over a small pot with about an inch of water and the water should be simmering. Do not allow the bottom of bowl to touch the hot water or else you might scramble the eggs.

yes, when you fold in the flour, do it gently so as not to deflate the eggs. I do not use the machine to fold in the flour.

The kuih bahulu will be crispy when it comes out of the oven but will turn nice and moist when cool.

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