Foodie

Wednesday, June 29, 2005

Wonton Wrappers

The necessity to homemake wonton wrappers is that the store bought ones are not good eats and the urge to have a good bowl of wonton soup especially during the winters when it is cold outside, a nice hot bowl of soup is so comforting.


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Ingredients:

300g plain flour
2 eggs
1/2 tsp alkaline water (kan sui)
2-2 1/2 tsp (approximately) water



Method:


Put all the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until it resembles pea size crumble. Remove from food processor and knead until dough is smooth. Sprinkle a little tapioca flour on the table, place the dough over and flatten with rolling pin.Remove dough to a noodle-making machine and roll out dough to paper thin sheets. Fold the pastry into five layers. Dust each layer well with tapioca flour. Stamp out with round cutters or cut into squares. Stack up the wonton wrappers/skin in an airtight container

Serves

30 comments:

Precious Moments said...

pei fu pei fu! you are really shifu. making your own wanton skin.

Jan said...

hm.. i am thinking of deep fried wonton with plump sauce......

Anonymous said...

can you use this recipe to make noodles too?

*tt

lilyng said...

tt

in fact noodles can be made with any recipes as long as there is flour and water, the rest is the enhance the taste.

Evelyn said...

Thanks for the wanton wrapper recipe and also the Hokkien Mee recipe as I am staying in a small town of Mexico at the moment which I hardly can get any Asian food. BTW,I am a Malaysian too from Penang. I like your site. Hope to see more of those precious recipes.

lilyng said...

evelyn

my blog is for all especially all malaysians who are away from home and i can understand the urge. do email me for any questions you have or just drop a line or two.

I will be posting homemade wantan noodles soon

enjoy

Evelyn said...

Lily,

Thanks for sharing all your precious recipes as it is hard to find the basic recipes like these. I have tried out your Sing Chow Mei, my DH & my maids loves it but I will try to add the shredded lettuce and the shallot crisps next time. I put less curry powder as my DH and DS didn't like too spicy.

lilyng said...

evelyn

there is no fast rule in savory, tune]in to your family's taste
[

jiayi said...

i am staying in UK.....and i cant find kan sui!!! howw? i wanna make wantan and tau fu fah and so many other things..but no kan sui...any substitute?

lilyng said...

jiayi

i think there is kan sui in the asian store. look for 'lye' water

Anonymous said...

salute!! i'm a student studying at russia.. i spent my holiday at kitchen with guidence of ur site

may said...

hallo lilly,

i tried making my own wantan the other day and it turns out good. the only mistake i did was putting the wantan on top of each other after wrapping. the dough got stuck together with the meat inside and all my hard work a disaster. my question is how do i freeze my wantan wrappers without having any problems peeling each wantan out without breaking it? i guess my dough was too soft coz i did not add in any eggs and no kan-sui.

lilyng said...

may

incidently i too made wantan soup with store bought wrappers. they were so horrible that i had to remove all the wrappers from the cooked wantan. they are edible and i even thin the wrappers down by rolling a few at a time. what a shame. these store bought wrappers are made with just flour and water, so that is why they are so mushy. they are meant to be fried.

you would have to dust with alot of cornstarch/tapioca starch inbetween the pieces before wrapping with cling wrap and aluminium foil before putting in the freezer.

Use eggs and kan sui for your next try, it is worth the while

Anonymous said...

Hi Lily,

I stumbled upon your website from thefreshloaf.com (your pita bread recipe looks awesome!). Wow, what a blessing! I am 6 months pregnant and am SOOOO missing homemade Chinese food that one absolutely cannot get here in the Southeast USA! (BOO!!!) I looked through many of your recipes and my mouth just start to water...

Anyway, I have a question. Is the KAN SUI the same as the potassium bicarbonate solution that I've seen in your other mein recipes? Can I use that instead?

Thanks!

lilyng said...

anonymous

yes, it is the same, kan sui = potassium bicarbonae solution

lktan_sinee said...

Hi Lily,
Thanks for your recipes. My hubby followed this recipe and made it twice, just want to say he put 2 1/2 tbsp water instead.

lilyng said...

iktan_sinee

liquid needed for working with flour differs from day to day or season and sometimes the egg size too if a factor too.

Anonymous said...

Hi Lily-

Your site is incredibly helpful in filling in the gaps that my Grandmother never explained ( or I forgot).
This wont ton skin recipe is terrific!
I am on a quest to figure out hand pulled noodles (lai mein). Chefs here are willing to show a little of the technique, but have not had any luck in figuring out the special dough that can take the pulling and stretching. Typical noodle doughs don't work.
Do you have any ideas or tips?
Would appreciate any help!
Thank you and keep up the great work!!
c wong

lilyng said...

cwong

strangely, you are the second person to ask me about pull noodles. i have just borrowed a cookbook - florence lin on noodles and dumplings and she has a done a very good job on how pull noodle is done. Try and get hold of a copy and if not able, you can write to me and i will try and scan it for you.

Anonymous said...

Thanks lily!

What is the title of her book? Maybe it is in our library system. If I can't locate it, then a scan would be great. I'll keep you posted.

By the way, I am presently working on a home-made, MSG free oyster sauce recipe, that is less salty and more oyster tasting. Have you ever tried this?

All the best and thanks for the quick reply!

cwong

lilyng said...

cwong

i did tried making oyster sauce and although it was less salty, it was more 'sang', i could only use it for cooking.

the book is called - florence lin's - chinese noodles, dumplings and breads. google it and you will find it.

bz said...

Hi Lily,

I'll definitely going to try your recipe.

Anyway, can we use the same ingredients to make wantan noodles?

Cheers.

Anonymous said...

Hi Lily-

I found Florence Lin's book in our library system! So I am experimenting with the dough recipe she gives and am encouraged that I have gotten a few pulls, but need to practice much more. Thanks again for your tip. Will let you know how it goes.

All the best,
Cwong

lilyng said...

bz

yes, you can certainly use this recipe to make the noodles

Anonymous said...

Hi Lily,
I found a bottle of lye water in my fridge! I forgot when did i buy it, maybe up to 7 years old?!?! Do you think it is still ok for cooking? Or do i have to throw it out? There's no expiry date on the bottle.

pam

lilyng said...

pam

i think you can still use the lye water. if it does not work, the dough will not turn yellow but you can still make good wrappers

linda said...

Hi,
I dont have any pasta maker, can i make noodles just by rolling them out?? Another question, in your hokkien noodles recipe it requires high protein flour and this plain flour, what is the difference if i'm using this recipe to make noodles?

lilyng said...

linda

yes, just roll the dough and cut into noodles.

high protein flour has more gluten than plain flour, so it needs less time kneading to create a nice dough

Anonymous said...

Hey Lily,
I'm Brandon. can i ask if i really don't have 'kan sui' can i ue sodium bicarbonate as substitute? Or should i jz proceed with the recipe without putting 'kan sui'?
If want to keep d skin over night in d fridge do i need to dust lots of corn flour?

lilyng said...

brandon

baking soda and kan sui are both alkali but kan sui is more potent. Use 1 tsp of baking soda and dissolve it in the water used for mixing.

yes, please do dust with cornstarch/flour between layers and making sure they are wrapped well to prevent drying out.

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