Foodie

Friday, July 15, 2005

Sing Chow Mei

This fried mei fun is called 'sing chow' - singapore. How is it associated, i do not know. If singaporeans can enlighten me, i would be most happy to know.

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Ingredients:
300g mei fun, soaked and well drained
6 tbsp oil
3 eggs
Juice of 1 lime
1/2 tsp chopped garlic
1 large onion, shredded
75g chicken meat, shredded
75g prawns, shelled
75 g char siew shredded
1 carrot, shredded
200 g beansprouts, tailed

Seasoning

1 tbsp curry powder
1 tbsp light soya sauce
2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp chilly sauce
2 tbsp tomato sauce
1 tsp sesame oil
Salt and sugar to taste
Dash of pepper

Garnishing

Chopped spring onion and coriander leaves
Sliced red chillies

Method:


Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a wok and fry meehoon for 1–2 minutes until lightly golden.

Heat another 2 tbsp oil and fry garlic until fragrant. Add chicken, prawns, char siew , carrot and onions. Stir-fry briefly. Add mei fun and seasoning ingredients. Toss well to combine.

Push to the sides and add 2 tbsp oil in the centre of wok, add the eggs , push back the mei fun to the eggs and fry until eggs are done.

Add beansprouts to mix and continue to cook for an extra 2–3 minutes and squeeze in the lime juice.

Dish out and serve with garnishings.

Serves

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Lily,
This dish was created by chefs in Hong Kong many years ago. They used curry powder to fry the mee hoon and it was very tasty and became popular.They named it "sing chow mei" as Singapore was associated with S.E. Asia where curry and other hot and spicy dishes are popular.This dish did not originate from Singapore.

Pat Wong,Toronto

Anonymous said...

Lily,
This dish was created by chefs in Hong Kong many years ago. They used curry powder to fry the mee hoon and it was very tasty and became popular.They named it "sing chow mei" as Singapore was associated with S.E. Asia where curry and other hot and spicy dishes are popular.This dish did not originate from Singapore.

Pat Wong,Toronto

lilyng said...

pat wong

thanks for enlightening me. this is really a very delicious creation

speedoflight said...

Putting curry powder into the dish is not a common thing found in the "Sing Chow Mei" done by food vendors in KL. I used to wonder why curry powder was dumped into the dish when the vendors in KL do not add it in. It is not easy to find good "Sing Chow Mei" in KL. Not many vendors many have this dish. I can only recollect of the best version I had more than 18 years ago. It beats out the version done here in the US with curry powder. I'd always felt that the curry powder drowned out the taste of the dish.

speedoflight said...

I forgot to add that if you examine the recipes by Malaysian chefs for "Sing Chow Mei", you'd find that it doesn't have curry powder in it. For example, Amy Beh's recipe from kuali.com for "Sing Chow Mei" does not call for curry powder. I am not entirely convinced that this dish originated from Hong Kong.

speedoflight said...

Found a URL that describes the origins of the Sing Chow Mei noodle. See the description and comments:

View the article on Rasa Malaysia.

Anonymous said...

Hi Lily,

May i know what is Worcestershire sauce? Where can i get them? I'm located at Aus.

Baybee

lilyng said...

baybee

i like to use the brand lea and perrins but there are other brands which are just as good Read about it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcestershire_sauce

d3v|LaNg3L said...

Add on the green capsicum make it more tasty ^^

It's really difficult to find tasty Sing Chow Mai in KL, but in KK, Sabah There is one old restaurant at Foh Sang name as "Diamond" The only Sing Chow Mai that got the taste there. Yummy~~

Tze Hui said...

hi! I've been a frequent reader of your blog and your recipes are amazing! I tried the zebra cake and it was really spongy with just the right amount of sweetness :)

anyway i gave my mom this recipe to try out; by frying the meehoon you mean stir-fry or deep fry?

and there's absolutely no water added is it?

lilyng said...

tze hui

the meifun has to be soaked and drained. it should be stir-fried with oil and it will get cooked. this dish is supposed to be dried with no sauce. if the meifun is the thicker type, you could add in some water to create steam to cook it, but cook it until dry.

Anonymous said...

Hi Lily

Yesterday at a farewell lunch, someone made a good tong fun noodles (glass noodles). I am wondering do you have any stir fry tong fun noodles recipe that you can share?

Thanks
Kim

lilyng said...

Kim

Try this recipe http://lilyng2000.blogspot.com/2006/02/japchae.html

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